An expert team to ensure high-quality support

Quality of life doesn’t just happen; there needs to be a plan. Our clinical team consists of experienced professionals who earned a minimum of a Master’s Degree in the fields of Counseling Psychology or Social Work. They work with each person and their core team to create personalized plans of support that are regularly revisited to confirm that the outcomes are successful. Further, they train all direct support staff in these plans to ensure that they are being effectively and consistently accomplished at every level.

Support that matters

At New Hope Community, the well-being of the people we support takes top priority. Clinicians with Master’s Degrees in the fields of Counseling Psychology and Social Work play an extremely important role for both the people who live at New Hope Community as well as for the staff who support them.

Our clinicians are available for a wide range of services, from crisis intervention and counseling to therapeutic workshops and support groups. Clinicians also support our staff by offering training in crisis intervention, individualized support, and education to help understand the complex and varying psychiatric/psychological conditions people may experience.

Quality of life confirmed

Quality of life doesn’t just happen; there needs to be a plan. Our clinical team is comprised of experienced professionals who hold a minimum of a Master’s Degree in the fields of Counseling Psychology or Social Work. They work with each person and their core team to put together personalized plans of support that are regularly revisited to confirm that the outcomes are successful. Further, they train all direct support staff in these plans to ensure that they are being effectively and consistently enacted at every level.

New Hope is up to the unique task of providing clinical services to people with Dual Diagnosis

All of our Clinicians are trained in providing therapy to people with mental illness. What makes our department unique is the ability to provide support to individuals with both Developmental Disabilities and mental illness. Often the “traditional” therapy model is not adequate for our residents, so the clinic team continues to utilize creative methods to help assist the people we suppport in need of support.

The Clinicians provide innovative group settings for residents to explore topics such as expressing emotions, dealing with anger, navigating the roads of romantic relationships, and grieving the passing of loved ones. The team uses assistive technology to help facilitate communication of feelings. Therapy is carried out in non-traditional settings and at non-traditional times. Trainings are provided to staff to teach counseling skills in the home. By utilizing these and many other techniques, the Clinic Department remains successful in supporting individuals with Dual Diagnosis.

What are Developmental Disabilities?

“Developmental Disability” is a term used to describe a lifelong disability that impacts typical growth and development. It may be attributable to mental and/or physical impairments, and manifests before the age of 22 years. The term refers to disabilities affecting daily functioning any of the following areas: capacity for independent living, economic self-sufficiency, ability to learn and retain information, receptive and expressive language, self-care, and self-direction. People with Intellectual Disability, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Epilepsy, or Neurological Impairment are all considered to have a Developmental Disability.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES TERMINOLOGY

Intellectual Disability refers to a type of disability that impacts the way a person thinks and learns. Intellectually Disabled persons vary in their reading skills and mathematical abilities. They may have difficulty learning and thinking in abstract terms, and adapting what they learn to everyday situations.  People with Intellectual Disabilities may have challenges in such areas as social skills, daily living skills, safety awareness, work skills, academic skills, leisure participation, and communication.  Intellectual Disabilities are non-reversible and occur before the age of 22.

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a general term used to describe a group of complex developmental brain disorders that affect communication, socialization, and sensory experiences.  ASD occurs during childhood and is not curable, though with treatment, individuals who have ASD may be able to lead engaging and productive lives.  The key to treating ASD is early intervention and a multi-layered approach to therapy and other interventions.  ASD is a spectrum disorder, meaning all individuals with ASD may show different symptomology and severity of symptoms.

Epilepsy is a medical condition that produces seizures affecting a variety of mental and physical functions.  Epilepsy may or may not be classified as a Developmental Disability, depending on the frequency and severity of a person’s seizure activity. For epilepsy to be considered a Developmental Disability, it must occur before the age of 22 and have significant impairment on typical development.

In the field of developmental disabilities, Dual Diagnosis refers to the condition of having both a developmental disability and a mental illness. Dual Diagnosis is very common among the developmentally disabled population.

Neurological Impairment refers to a broad group of disorders in which the central nervous system does not function properly and leads to some form of physical or mental problems. The central nervous system is made up of the brain and the spinal cord. A neurological impairment, which affects the brain or spinal cord, can affect a wide range of different capabilities, from motor skills to memory. Traumatic Brain Injury, or an injury to the brain that results in a permanent change in function, can occur any time before the age of 22 to be considered a Developmental Disability.

The term Cerebral Palsy refers to any one of a number of neurological disorders that appear in infancy or early childhood and permanently affect body movement and muscle coordination. Even though cerebral palsy affects muscle movement, it isn’t caused by problems in the muscles or nerves. It is caused by abnormalities in parts of the brain that control muscle movements.

A mental illness is defined as a condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others, and daily functioning. Mental illnesses are medical conditions that affect the brain, and often result in a loss of capacity for coping with the demands of everyday living. Some common mental illnesses include Schizophrenia, Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Impulse Control Disorder, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Many mental illnesses require a combination of medication (to alleviate symptoms) and therapy (to develop coping techniques).

For more information please contact Erin Rion, Director of Clinical Services, at 845-434-8300, extension 295 or via email to erion@newhopecommunity.org